Artist Edmonia Lewis was a prominent black sculptor in the 19th century.

At the drop of a hat, any art buff could name a prominent 19th-century artist, whether it’s Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar Degas or Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

But how sharp is your knowledge of prominent black artists of that same era?

Considering the 19th century’s extreme racial divide, and the Civil War breaking out midway (April 9, 2015 will mark 150 years since the end of the war), it was difficult for black artists to break out. However, art still prevailed and quite a few artists were able to make a name for themselves, in the U.S. and abroad.
— Read on mashable.com/2015/03/15/19th-century-black-artists/

Sidney Barthwell was once the owner of the largest black-owned drugstore chain, Barthwell Drugs, in the United States. He opened a new store every two years until he had a total of 13 stores around Detroit.

Barthwell was born in Cordele, Georgia on February 17, 1906. As a young child, he attended Lucius H. Holsey Academy of Excellence. In 1922, he left Georgia when he was 14 to join his father in Chicago and found work in a meat packing plant.  Barthwell attended the prestigious Cass Technical High School where he was enrolled in a course that specialized in pharmacological sciences.  After graduating from high school in 1925, Barthwell attended Detroit Technological Institute and graduated in 1929 with a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy.
— Read on blackthen.com/sidney-barthwell-one-owner-largest-black-owned-drugstore-chain-barthwell-drugs/

Read moor on the Barthwell’s here

Some of the most beloved novels in recent memory are those by black authors—think Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad or the book-of-the-moment, Tayari Jones’ An American Marriage. But while modern bookshelves have become more reflective of the diversity around us, such perspectives were not always welcomed with the same respect—or with any at all.
— Read on earlybirdbooks.com/must-read-books-by-iconic-black-authors

“There is nothing (-/+) here,” concludes Sylvia Y. Cyrus, executive director of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Cyrus affirms that this month is a “very important celebration of American history and provides the opportunity for Americans to celebrate the contributions of Blacks.”

Our contributions have only been hidden by white peoples hatred of it’s truth…the only reason why we didn’t know is because they successfully took advantage of what we we’re already living, appreciating and defended…on the grand scale they wanted what they couldn’t tolerate and they wanted to see it die because they couldn’t benefit from it!!!! I don’t play games this once just know your why I prove my points on your hatred of my existence.
— Read on seattlemedium.com/black-history-month-hashtag-viewed-as-disgraceful/

The work of Marcellous Lovelace is based in escaping the worst situation possible. Born and raised on the South Side of Chicago to a down to earth southern family. My background in Art came from the heart and soul of Africans all over the world. My paintings are Images of what I study and continue to live through. Using basically anything to draw and paint with my works are always about something building positivity and whats important, because the world we live is so negative and unimportant. Coming from a world of police brutality and racism stands a Man who is not afraid to be exactly who he is all the time regardless of who it affects. If it is Political or Reality I’m going to paint it just as it is. My imagination allows me the freedom to live in Actual Facts and not taint my self in materialism and a fabricated world of clothing with shiny trickles. I’m a Man who is brave, strong, thoughtful, intelligent and defined by my realistic character…
— Read on 2017blackart.wordpress.com/2015/06/03/2014-protect-yourself-from-the-beast-art-by-marcellous-lovelace-2/

The sad and harsh reality for Black people is that there is nothing that separates the Trayvons, Erics, and Sandras from any of us,” says Atlanta-based photographer Ervin A. Johnson of the young African American men and women victims of police violence in the United States. As a Black man, the photographer has faced that fact head-on, and from the anxiety and despair that comes with it, he derives the power to make his voice—and so many others—heard. For #InHonor, Johnson applies solvents to his photographic portraits, allowing the physical distortion of pigment to stand in for the brutality that has been and continues to be done to living, breathing Black bodies.

#InHonor, admits Johnson, resulted in large part from the guilt that came with standing on the sidelines while others marched and in some cases, risked their lives in protest of the persecution of Black Americans. The shootings, strangulations, and abuse of Black citizens brought with them currents of fear, intimidation, and feelings of helplessness; these experiences, stresses Johnson, are not unique to him, but ultimately, he chose to speak out in a way that only he could do.

Johnson began by photographing his friends and acquaintances and was quickly overwhelmed with eager faces wanting to be a part of the #InHonor movement. He continues to photograph throughout Atlanta, New York, and Chicago, with upcoming sessions in the latter in November. The process of decomposing the prints is one he’s honed over a long period of time, and he’s hesitant to go into technical details, explaining only that he has over the course of the project gained control over the ways in which various solvents interact with and disrupt the photographic paper.

While many have been quick to comment on the aesthetic merits of Johnson’s method, he confesses that hearing people describe the work as “beautiful” is upsetting. With each portrait, the artist and his subject have revisited the traumas people who have died and been violated, and in turn, they have acknowledged that they are in fact, as innocent men and women of color, in very real danger. The process is a painful one, and the erasure of pigment, no matter how artfully executed, is a reminder of violence and an elegy to those who have been lost to it.
— Read on www.featureshoot.com/2015/10/inhonor-portraits-make-visible-the-violence-that-has-been-done-to-black-bodies-cry-out-for-change/