“There is nothing (-/+) here,” concludes Sylvia Y. Cyrus, executive director of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Cyrus affirms that this month is a “very important celebration of American history and provides the opportunity for Americans to celebrate the contributions of Blacks.”

Our contributions have only been hidden by white peoples hatred of it’s truth…the only reason why we didn’t know is because they successfully took advantage of what we we’re already living, appreciating and defended…on the grand scale they wanted what they couldn’t tolerate and they wanted to see it die because they couldn’t benefit from it!!!! I don’t play games this once just know your why I prove my points on your hatred of my existence.
— Read on seattlemedium.com/black-history-month-hashtag-viewed-as-disgraceful/

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The work of Marcellous Lovelace is based in escaping the worst situation possible. Born and raised on the South Side of Chicago to a down to earth southern family. My background in Art came from the heart and soul of Africans all over the world. My paintings are Images of what I study and continue to live through. Using basically anything to draw and paint with my works are always about something building positivity and whats important, because the world we live is so negative and unimportant. Coming from a world of police brutality and racism stands a Man who is not afraid to be exactly who he is all the time regardless of who it affects. If it is Political or Reality I’m going to paint it just as it is. My imagination allows me the freedom to live in Actual Facts and not taint my self in materialism and a fabricated world of clothing with shiny trickles. I’m a Man who is brave, strong, thoughtful, intelligent and defined by my realistic character…
— Read on 2017blackart.wordpress.com/2015/06/03/2014-protect-yourself-from-the-beast-art-by-marcellous-lovelace-2/

The sad and harsh reality for Black people is that there is nothing that separates the Trayvons, Erics, and Sandras from any of us,” says Atlanta-based photographer Ervin A. Johnson of the young African American men and women victims of police violence in the United States. As a Black man, the photographer has faced that fact head-on, and from the anxiety and despair that comes with it, he derives the power to make his voice—and so many others—heard. For #InHonor, Johnson applies solvents to his photographic portraits, allowing the physical distortion of pigment to stand in for the brutality that has been and continues to be done to living, breathing Black bodies.

#InHonor, admits Johnson, resulted in large part from the guilt that came with standing on the sidelines while others marched and in some cases, risked their lives in protest of the persecution of Black Americans. The shootings, strangulations, and abuse of Black citizens brought with them currents of fear, intimidation, and feelings of helplessness; these experiences, stresses Johnson, are not unique to him, but ultimately, he chose to speak out in a way that only he could do.

Johnson began by photographing his friends and acquaintances and was quickly overwhelmed with eager faces wanting to be a part of the #InHonor movement. He continues to photograph throughout Atlanta, New York, and Chicago, with upcoming sessions in the latter in November. The process of decomposing the prints is one he’s honed over a long period of time, and he’s hesitant to go into technical details, explaining only that he has over the course of the project gained control over the ways in which various solvents interact with and disrupt the photographic paper.

While many have been quick to comment on the aesthetic merits of Johnson’s method, he confesses that hearing people describe the work as “beautiful” is upsetting. With each portrait, the artist and his subject have revisited the traumas people who have died and been violated, and in turn, they have acknowledged that they are in fact, as innocent men and women of color, in very real danger. The process is a painful one, and the erasure of pigment, no matter how artfully executed, is a reminder of violence and an elegy to those who have been lost to it.
— Read on www.featureshoot.com/2015/10/inhonor-portraits-make-visible-the-violence-that-has-been-done-to-black-bodies-cry-out-for-change/

Whether or not you’re crushing HIIT workouts as often as you’re tossing back summer beers, stretching and self-myofascial release are critical for a well-operating body. Since most of our days are spent hunched over a computer and sad office lunches, stiff joints and tight muscles are part of the norm. That’s where mobility comes in.

“Mobility is something that will improve your overall fitness goals and daily activities,” says Daury Dross, lead instructor at the fhitting room in New York City. “I myself have three bulging discs in my back from a car accident and was told I could never do back-loaded squats. Incorporating exercises like these into my daily stretching routine changed that and made me feel great again.”
— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/greatist.com/fitness/stretching-exercises-moves-that-hit-hard-to-reach-muscles/amp

William Claire Harding was born in Wichita, Kansas, on November 13, 1904.  I don’t know anything about his parents or his upbringing, but indirect evidence suggests that the family probably moved to Chicago when he was relatively young.  In the early 1920s he attended Knox College of Galesburg, Illinois, for at least a year; by fall 1924, he had transferred to Wilberforce University in Ohio, home of one of the best black college football teams in the country.  He also played basketball and baseball in college, but he was best known as a quarterback and punter.

At the time there was evidently a problem with what you might call “revolvers” in black college football, players who used up their eligibility at one school, then simply moved on to another one.  Elwood Barker blew the whistle on this sort of activity in a 1933 article in the Chicago Defender, noting for example that “a few years ago” a number of players at “a certain school in Georgia” popped up two years later, en masse, at “another school in Tennessee and being called young blood” (Chicago Defender, September 9, 1933).  Often the college teams claimed that new players were freshmen recruited out of high school, touting recommendations from their former high school coaches, when in reality the school had simply recruited them from a rival.  The insinuation here is that the players were being paid under the table, and that at least the major colleges were effectively running professional or semi-professional football teams.

Halley Harding, wrote Barker, departed from the usual pattern, first by essentially doing his own PR work, developing a network of contacts among the sportswriters of the black weeklies; and second by advertising the fact that he was moving from college to college rather than trying to conceal it.  His openness apparently didn’t hurt his college career; aside from Knox and Wilberforce, Harding also played for Wiley College in Texas and Fisk University, running up a total of at least seven (and possibly more) college football seasons from 1924 through 1931.
— Read on agatetype.typepad.com/agate_type/2013/02/halley-harding.html