Khady Thiam Gueye certainly punches above her own weight beyond being known as “Akon’s sister”.
Fourteen years since Akon released his debut single, Locked Up, the Senegalese-American musician and entrepreneur has created a multi-million dollar brand and according to Black Enterprise.com, Akon owes a lot of his success to his sister, Khady Thiam Gueye.

The brand is said to be worth $80 million
— Read on www.w24.co.za/

The original architectural drawings for the proposed campuses of Duke University are true works of art, grand in scale and exquisite in detail. As was common they are unsigned with the only credit being in the name of the Philadelphia firm of Horace Trumbauer, Architect. The chief designer of the firm and draftsman, #JulianFAbele, in discussing the unique style of the drawings, once proudly proclaimed, “The shadows are all mine.” With that statement Abele unknowingly articulated a central fact of his life. As an African American, he lived in the shadows as time and circumstance conspired to conceal his considerable professional talent.

— Read on blackthen.com/did-you-know-that-a-black-man-was-the-chief-designer-of-the-original-architectural-drawings-for-duke-university/

There is a historical relationship between Nazism and white supremacy in the United States. Yet the recent resurgence of explicit racism, including the attack in Charlottesville, has been greeted by many with surprise.

But collective amnesia has consequences. When Americans celebrate the country’s victory in WWII, but forget that the U.S. armed forces were segregated, that the Red Cross segregated blood donors or that many black WWII veterans returned to the country only to be denied jobs or housing, it becomes all the more difficult to talk honestly about racism today.

— Read on www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-african-american-soldiers-saw-world-war-ii-two-front-battle-180964616/

The dap is a gesture among African American men which expresses unity, strength, defiance or resistance. On the other hand the dap ist used as a complex language for communication. “The dap and the black power handshake, which evolved from the dap, were important symbols of black consciousness, identity, and cultural unity throughout black communities the world over!

— Read on fabianrottmann.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/photoblogging-five-on-the-black-hand-side-by-lamont-hamilton/amp/

The Dahomey Amazons or Mino was an all-female military regiment of the Fon people of the Kingdom of Dahomey in the present-day Republic of Benin. They existed from the 17th century to the end of the 19th century. While European narratives refer to the women soldiers as “Amazons,” because of their similarity to the semi-mythical Amazons of ancient Anatolia, they called themselves Ahosi (king’s wives) or Mino (our mothers) in the Fon language.

The Ahosi were extremely well trained, and inculcated with a very aggressive attitude. They were ferocious fighters with a reputation for decapitating soldiers in the middle of battle, as well as those who were unfortunate to become their captives.

Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh was one of the great leaders of the Mino. In 1851 she led an army of 6,000 women against the Egba fortress of Abeokuta. Because the Mino were armed with spears, bows and swords while the Egba had European cannons, only about 1,200 survived the extended battle.
— Read on atlantablackstar.com/2013/10/29/10-fearless-black-female-warriors-throughout-history/2/

Artist Edmonia Lewis was a prominent black sculptor in the 19th century.

At the drop of a hat, any art buff could name a prominent 19th-century artist, whether it’s Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar Degas or Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

But how sharp is your knowledge of prominent black artists of that same era?

Considering the 19th century’s extreme racial divide, and the Civil War breaking out midway (April 9, 2015 will mark 150 years since the end of the war), it was difficult for black artists to break out. However, art still prevailed and quite a few artists were able to make a name for themselves, in the U.S. and abroad.
— Read on mashable.com/2015/03/15/19th-century-black-artists/

Sidney Barthwell was once the owner of the largest black-owned drugstore chain, Barthwell Drugs, in the United States. He opened a new store every two years until he had a total of 13 stores around Detroit.

Barthwell was born in Cordele, Georgia on February 17, 1906. As a young child, he attended Lucius H. Holsey Academy of Excellence. In 1922, he left Georgia when he was 14 to join his father in Chicago and found work in a meat packing plant.  Barthwell attended the prestigious Cass Technical High School where he was enrolled in a course that specialized in pharmacological sciences.  After graduating from high school in 1925, Barthwell attended Detroit Technological Institute and graduated in 1929 with a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy.
— Read on blackthen.com/sidney-barthwell-one-owner-largest-black-owned-drugstore-chain-barthwell-drugs/

Read moor on the Barthwell’s here