Category: Our Stories 365

Ancient Egypt’s Role in European History

The salient reality is that no one can deny the historical truism that the Greeks (the world’s first Europeans) went to ancient Kemet to study at the Temple of Waset (later called Thebes by the Greeks and Luxor by the Arabs).

In his magnum opus, A Lost Tradition: African Philosophy in World History, (1995) Dr. Theophile Obenga quotes Aristotle ranking Egypt as “the most ancient archeological reserve in the world” and “that is how the Egyptians, whom we (Greeks) considered as the most ancient of the human race” (p. 45).

According to Dr. Obenga: “the ancient Greeks traced all human inventions to the Egyptians, from Calculus, Geometry, Astronomy and Dice Games to Writing…Since the time of Homer, Egyptian antiquity functioned strictly as a highly memorialized component of Greek history. Herodotus said it, Plato confirmed it, and Aristotle never denied it.” (p. 47). Indeed, in their book, A History of the Modern World (1984), R. R. Palmer and Joel Colton, corroborate this historical truism by contending that:

Europeans were by no means the pioneer of human civilization. Half of man’s recorded history had passed before anyone in Europe could read or write. The priests of Egypt began to keep written records between 4000 and 3000 B.C., but more than two thousand years later, the poems of Homer were still being circulated in the Greek city-states by word of mouth. Shortly after 3000 B.C., while the pharaohs were building the first pyramids, Europeans were creating nothing more distinguished than huge garbage heaps…
— Read on www.africaspeaks.com/reasoning/index.php

Black Gods Whitewashed in Recent History

The Brahma Samhita is a Sanskrit Pancaratra text composed of verses of prayer spoken by Brahma glorifying the supreme Lord Krishna or Govinda at the beginning of creation.
The lyrics, chapter 5 verse 38 reads: “I worship Govinda, the primeval Lord, who plays on His transcendental flute. His eyes are like lotus flowers, He is decorated with peacock plumes, and His bodily color resembles the color of a fresh black cloud, although His bodily features are more beautiful than millions of Cupids.”
Chapter 6, verses 1-2 reads: “The Lord was dressed in yellow garments and had a blackish complexion.”
The Sanskrit word “Krishna” has the literal meaning “black,”  ”dark” or  ”dark-blue.” Krishna is also called “Śyāma,” the blackish one, or the beautiful dark boy with a blackish color.

— Read on afroscar.blogspot.com/2014/04/black-gods-whitewashed-in-recent-history.html

Hatshepsut

Hatshepsut (1479-1458 BCE) was the first female ruler of ancient Egypt to reign as a male with the full authority of pharaoh. Her name means “Foremost of Noble Women” or “She is First Among Noble Women”.  She began her reign as regent to her stepson Thuthmose III (1458-1425 BCE) who would succeed her and, initially, ruled as a woman as depicted in statuary. In around the seventh year of her reign, however, she chose to be depicted as a male pharaoh in statuary and reliefs though still referring to herself as female in her inscriptions. She was the fifth pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty during the period known as the New Kingdom (1570-1069 BCE) and regarded as one of the best.

Although she is sometimes cited as the first female ruler of Egypt, or the only one, there were women who reigned before her such as Merneith (c. 3000 BCE) in the Early Dynastic Period (probably as regent) and Sobeknefru (c. 1807-1802 BCE) in the Middle Kingdom and Twosret (1191-1190 BCE) after her toward the end of the 19th Dynasty. Hatshepsut, though not the first or last, is undoubtedly the best known female ruler of ancient Egypt after Cleopatra VII (c. 69-30 BCE) and one of the most successful monarchs in Egyptian history…
— Read on www.google.com/amp/s/www.ancient.eu/amp/1-743/

Highly-rated charities promoting black health, education, rights and community development

Moor History Is Everyday not just the shortest month of the year!!!!!!!!

Each February the United Snakes observes Black History Month. This month is intended to honor the history, struggles, and triumphs of black people in America and across the world.

Historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson, the son of freed slaves, was concerned that black children were not being taught about their ancestors’ accomplishments in school. In 1926, he and his organization, the Association for the Study of Negro Life, announced that the second week of February would be set aside as Negro History Week. This week includes President Lincoln’s birthday (2/12) and the day Frederick Douglass celebrated his birth (2/14).

Fifty years later, under President Gerald R. Ford, the celebration was expanded to encompass the entire month of February and became known as Black History Month. President Ford urged Americans to, “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

This month, consider supporting one of these highly-rated organizations that are working diligently to promote black health, education, rights and community development in the United States, and celebrate the values of this important month.

— Read on www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm

“THIRST FOR JUSTICE”: INDIANA’S PIONEERING BLACK LAWYERS

On August 4, 1932, the National Bar Association—a consortium of black lawyers established in 1924 after its founding members were denied ABA membership—convened at the Walker Casino in Indianapolis for its Eighth Annual Convention.

Our colored attorney has a fight that is peculiar. Segregation has a tendency to prevent our receiving a fair deal. Learned as they are in the law, if we ever get what is coming it will have to be through the leadership of the lawyers of this country. From everywhere we have come and met on Indiana soil; we find here the best of our group—the National Bar Association—in the City of Indianapolis.
— Read on www.indianalegalarchive.com/journal/2015/2/18/thirst-for-justice