The Dahomey Amazons or Mino was an all-female military regiment of the Fon people of the Kingdom of Dahomey in the present-day Republic of Benin. They existed from the 17th century to the end of the 19th century. While European narratives refer to the women soldiers as “Amazons,” because of their similarity to the semi-mythical Amazons of ancient Anatolia, they called themselves Ahosi (king’s wives) or Mino (our mothers) in the Fon language.

The Ahosi were extremely well trained, and inculcated with a very aggressive attitude. They were ferocious fighters with a reputation for decapitating soldiers in the middle of battle, as well as those who were unfortunate to become their captives.

Seh-Dong-Hong-Beh was one of the great leaders of the Mino. In 1851 she led an army of 6,000 women against the Egba fortress of Abeokuta. Because the Mino were armed with spears, bows and swords while the Egba had European cannons, only about 1,200 survived the extended battle.
— Read on atlantablackstar.com/2013/10/29/10-fearless-black-female-warriors-throughout-history/2/

Artist Edmonia Lewis was a prominent black sculptor in the 19th century.

At the drop of a hat, any art buff could name a prominent 19th-century artist, whether it’s Vincent Van Gogh, Edgar Degas or Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

But how sharp is your knowledge of prominent black artists of that same era?

Considering the 19th century’s extreme racial divide, and the Civil War breaking out midway (April 9, 2015 will mark 150 years since the end of the war), it was difficult for black artists to break out. However, art still prevailed and quite a few artists were able to make a name for themselves, in the U.S. and abroad.
— Read on mashable.com/2015/03/15/19th-century-black-artists/

Sidney Barthwell was once the owner of the largest black-owned drugstore chain, Barthwell Drugs, in the United States. He opened a new store every two years until he had a total of 13 stores around Detroit.

Barthwell was born in Cordele, Georgia on February 17, 1906. As a young child, he attended Lucius H. Holsey Academy of Excellence. In 1922, he left Georgia when he was 14 to join his father in Chicago and found work in a meat packing plant.  Barthwell attended the prestigious Cass Technical High School where he was enrolled in a course that specialized in pharmacological sciences.  After graduating from high school in 1925, Barthwell attended Detroit Technological Institute and graduated in 1929 with a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy.
— Read on blackthen.com/sidney-barthwell-one-owner-largest-black-owned-drugstore-chain-barthwell-drugs/

Read moor on the Barthwell’s here

Some of the most beloved novels in recent memory are those by black authors—think Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad or the book-of-the-moment, Tayari Jones’ An American Marriage. But while modern bookshelves have become more reflective of the diversity around us, such perspectives were not always welcomed with the same respect—or with any at all.
— Read on earlybirdbooks.com/must-read-books-by-iconic-black-authors

“There is nothing (-/+) here,” concludes Sylvia Y. Cyrus, executive director of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Cyrus affirms that this month is a “very important celebration of American history and provides the opportunity for Americans to celebrate the contributions of Blacks.”

Our contributions have only been hidden by white peoples hatred of it’s truth…the only reason why we didn’t know is because they successfully took advantage of what we we’re already living, appreciating and defending…on the grand scale they wanted what they couldn’t tolerate and they wanted to see it die because they couldn’t benefit from it!!!! I don’t play games, this once just know your why I prove my points on your hatred of my existence.
— Read on seattlemedium.com/black-history-month-hashtag-viewed-as-disgraceful/